The pandemic finally hit home for me and my family. In her last semester of college, face-to-face classes at GRCC have been canceled into April, the campus labs have been closed, and as a result, Lady Ronn, no longer has a job. Which I’m sure will in a small way impact our financial situation, the amount of spending that we do, and as a result a small prick into the area economy. You can almost see the ripple effect going from local to state to federal to the world. Will this be the event that tips the balance and topples everything into a global depression? Let’s hope not.

The wife went shopping yesterday and got pulled into the hoarding panic that seems to be gripping so many of you. She had intended to just pick up the usual things, but seeing the empty shelves and the carts piled high tipped her into the, “I better get it now or it won’t be available” mentality. And she ended up coming home with far more stuff than the two of us have any need for. I’m not going to lie, I was annoyed.

I don’t deny that this is something that we’ve not seen in my lifetime. Or at least the reaction to it is something that we’ve not seen. I don’t think we yet know how serious this will be, and won’t know until after it’s over. Caution is warranted but this verges on panic and hysteria.

I have seen estimates that say as much as 70% of the population will contract this virus, but at this point there’s only 12 recorded cases in all of Michigan. And while I admit the lethality of this virus seems to be greater than that of the flu… it’s not a death sentence.

The advice seems pretty consistent. Wash your hands. Don’t touch your face. Apply social distancing whenever possible. Probably, don’t lick the sneeze guard at the buffet or try to tongue kiss everyone you meet. Use a little common sense.

There seems to be some expectation, or possibly just a desire for a break from work, that everything should close down and that we should all lock ourselves in our homes. I get it. I too would like to not have to go to work. But, that seems like it will just make things worse, differently.

I mean, the government seems pretty worried about the effects on the economy so we should all probably keep working.

Who exactly has the luxury of staying home during this covid-19 pandemic? I would guess that, in the vast majority, it’s those in the upper 50% of the workforce. Anybody making less than $15 or $20 an hour probably doesn’t have the luxury of taking 2-weeks or a month out of work, and certainly won’t be getting paid for it.

Just like during cold and flu season, most people don’t have the luxury of staying home if they have a slight fever and a cough. They’ve got bills to pay and responsibilities to take care of. So, whether it be at a restaurant, the gas station, the grocery store, or the pharmacy these people are going to go to work.

In this group, I include pretty much everyone that is in the service industry. My work has made no mention of us taking any time off, because building maintenance doesn’t care whether or not people are sick, things just need to get fixed. I’m just traveling around West Michigan like a carrier vector.

It’s certainly hope that this is all being overblown but, again, we won’t know until it’s all over and we look back on the numbers. I feel pretty confident that this is not a modern day black plague.

Take care of yourself. Stay healthy. Pay attention to what the WHO and CDC are advising. We’ll get through this. Later.

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