Things are still very busy around these parts, what with school and work and life going on. But I did find the time to put the terrible lizard back together.

cracked neck

busted tail

I didn’t put much effort into the repair, just some superglue and a bit of patience. All those wrinkles help to conceal the breaks and it looks good from across the room, but if you pick it up it’s pretty easy to spot where the repairs were made.
good enough

 

A few things to share.
1.) Still having issues keeping the site malware free. I was  going to take it apart and restore from a back-up, but I made the mistake of thinking that the Pro Backup service that comes with my Pro package at Bluehost was actually a thing… it’s not. So I need to call them and get a few things straightened out. Mainly, I’d like to get the services that I’m paying for. I’ll probably have a full tear down on the site this weekend to find and destroy whatever malware is hiding in my files.
2.) Final grades were posted for the winter semester and I pulled off an A in each of my classes–HVA 221 Ductwork Construction and Design was the one I just finished and HVA 230 HVACR Elec Controls was earlier in the Winter Semester. Both were three credit classes, so I added another 24 grade points to my total and my GPA is sitting at 3.839, according to my Unofficial GRCC Transcript.
3.) I came home to find this on the office floor.

extinction level event?

So my fancy Tyrannosaurus statue is now in 4 pieces. It can certainly be glued back together. But how evident will the cracks be? I’m not sure. I’ve resisted the urge to immediately grab the superglue and start putting it back together… going to give it some thought and determine if it’s going to need any other work and/or improvements.
How could this happen? One theory presented was that the wind blew it over. This is unlikely given the depth of the pegs on the feet and the weight of the base. Perhaps the blinds hit it? No. The blinds are secured with brackets. What could have happened? There is some evidence that points to a solution to the mystery.
claw marks! NEW claw marks!

There are some claw marks in the paint that were not there when I left for work. Probably too small to be the dog, but just about right for a smallish cat. My working theory is that the cat was on the shelf and killed the dinosaur. Possibly with the aid of the dog or a startling wind gust. Either way and whatever the circumstances, I have one very broken dinosaur.

Peanut butter and chocolate. Eggs and toast. Boys and girls. Somethings are just better as a pair. Such is the case with dinosaurs. If you have a triceratops you have to have a tyrannosaurus to make a complimentary pair. Am I right?

Of course I am. So I complimented my Sideshow Dinosauria Triceratops with their T-rex: The Tyrant King statue. Which is the same 1/15th scale and on a similar base. I don’t have anyplace where I can display them together, they’re too big. But here it is in all it’s coolness.

such tiny arms

Everything I said about the triceratops statue applies here. It’s big. It’s very detailed. It’s accurate. I like it very much. It’s a bit over 13-inches high and a whopping 30-inches long. At this size, I would be afraid if it were alive, full size and big as life I think shitting yourself would be the most likely scenario.

the tyrant king

Tyrannosaurus facts might look something like these; 40-feet long, 12-feet high at the hips, 10-12 tons. That’s a big lizard.

we’ll talk about that thing another time

In this next shot you can see that I painted the flag case holding my father’s flag and mounted it to the bookcase. I think I may add another couple boards to the frame for balance. You can see my cat, Cassie, under the shelf. You will note that she is only slightly larger than the statue. Also, I picked up the new boxed set of Stephen King’s Dark Tower series, because it’s awesome and I like my books to match.

as big as the cat

Before Star Wars. Before Dungeons & Dragons. Before all the things that pop culture taught me to enjoy, there were dinosaurs. And just like a countless number of children before and after me, I loved dinosaurs. I still love dinosaurs. But it is an allusive love that comes and goes from my mind, like that one song by that artist that you love but forget about completely until you hear it again. Jurassic Park movies, anyone.

This Christmas I received a reminder of that love. A little something to take me back to those simpler times when we still stood up to change the channel and went outside to play with our friends. My Christmas came in the form of a 66 million year old dinosaur, as replicated by Sideshow Collectibles. This is from their Dinosauria collection, the Triceratops Statue.

triceratops

This guy clocks in at about 1/15th scale and I always forget how big these things were, but a Triceratops was huge. Were talking somewhere in the range of 26-30 feet in length, 9.5-10 feet in height, and weighing in anywhere from 13,000-26000 pounds. This guy just fits on my 12-inch high shelf and for comparison, you’d use an original 4-inch Star Wars figure for size comparison. It’s a big statue and a big creature.

another view for scale

Sideshow has done a very nice job on this statue. They’ve worked with renown paleoartists to get the sculpt right and the realism is impressive. They say this is a museum quality piece and I would not argue the point with them. This is an beautiful piece that captures the magnitude and grace of this beast in tough polystone. The base is a little boring, but that just keeps it from distracting from the main event.

I’m very impressed. I’ve given this statue a prominent place on my shelf and it will be a constant reminder and rejuvenation of my own sense of wonder. Dinosaurs are cool. Again, I have to thank my wife for indulging me.

moving things around abit

Suddenly Frodo noticed that a strange-looking weather-beaten man, sitting in the shadows near the wall, was also listening intently to the hobbit-talk. He had a tall tankard in front of him, and was smoking a long-stemmed pipe curiously carved. His legs were stretched out before him, showing high boots of supple leather that fitted him well, but had seen much wear and were now caked with mud. A travel-stained cloak of heavy dark-green cloth was drawn close about him, and in spite of the heat of the room he wore a hood that overshadowed his face; but the gleam of his eyes could be seen as he watched the hobbits.

‘Who is that?’ Frodo asked, when he got a chance to whisper to Mr. Butterbur. ‘I don’t think you introduced him?’

‘Him?’ said the landlord in an answering whisper, cocking an eye without turning his head. ‘I don’t rightly know. He is one of the wandering folk—Rangers we call them. He seldom talks: not but what he can tell a rare tale when he has the mind. He disappears for a month, or a year, and then he pops up again. He was in and out pretty often last spring; but I haven’t seen him about lately. What his right name is I’ve never heard: but he’s known round here as Strider. Goes about at a great pace on his long shanks; though he don’t tell nobody what cause he has to hurry. But there’s no accounting for East and West, as we say in Bree, meaning the Rangers and the Shire-folk, begging your pardon. Funny you should ask about him.’ But at that moment Mr. Butterbur was called away by a demand for more ale and his last remark remained unexplained.

Frodo found that Strider was now looking at him, as if he had heard or guessed all that had been said. Presently, with a wave of his hand and a nod, he invited Frodo to come over and sit by him. As Frodo drew near be threw back his hood, showing a shaggy head of dark hair necked with grey, and in a pale stem face a pair of keen grey eyes.

‘I am called Strider,’ he said in a low voice. ‘I am very pleased to meet you. Master – Underhill, if old Butterbur got your name right.’

–The Fellowship of the Ring, J. R. R. Tolkien


Strider. Ranger of the North. Confidant of Gandalf the Grey. Heir of Isildur. Rightful claimant to the thrones of Arnor and Gondor.

This was supposed to be a Christmas present, but I became impatient and unpacked it early. I was crazy excited to have snagged this on ebay for a third of what they were selling for. Then when it arrived I was disappointed to realize that the $1,100 statues were all the ‘exclusive’ ones. They came with a second head sculpt, the one you see, and another with the hood down and a damn good sculpt of Victor Mortensen. Mine did not come with that second head. But when I realized that I’d be displaying mine with the hood up anyway, my disappointment was lessened. I’m not big on visualizing my favorite characters as a particular actor. Though, having said that, I think it was a very good portrayal.

Strider was always my favorite character from the Lord of the Rings. I don’t know how many D&D characters I modeled on him, but it was a lot. I’m very happy with this little guy and he looks good standing on my shelf.

This is a 1/6 scale, polystone statue (you can read that as hard resin). It is about 14-inches tall and is the same scale as my Buck Rogers, Flash Gordon, and Angel statues. The details are great. The cloak and boots are speckled with mud. He has a pack, bedroll, and quiver strapped on his back; ready to disappear into the woods. The sword looks great and the bow is strung with a thread.

Merry Christmas to me, but as always thanks have to be extended to Lady Ronn for allowing me to indulge in these excesses.